The television equivalent of dragging your nails down a blackboard is back, with a fantastic hour of paranoia and excruciating moments. Welcome back to Doctor Foster on BBC 1 with Suranne Jones as the GP now trying to get to grips with her ex-husband moving back to the area with his new wife.

It’s been a two-year wait for series two, and I’m pleased to say that Doctor Foster delivers. Fans of the show would inevitably wonder where it is going to go, and it’s gone even crazier in a good way, with Suranne Jones in top form as her character clearly has issues, especially when she pops up at her ex-hubby’s wedding party with a date in tow.

You could hear a pin drop in a great moment as she appeared, and then after son quits her home to live with dad, the final scene almost reminded me of Lady Macbeth in a Shakespearean scene, as she Foster dissolved her wedding ring in nitric acid.

Has she gone Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies, or is there another web of deception being weaved against her? It’s a neat twist where on the basis on episode one, your sympathies lay with her ex, Simon (Bertie Carvel), and her son Tom, who seems to have more sense than any of them!

Social media was not terribly kind to ITV’s new Saturday night show Cannonball, which is like Total Wipeout in the water. One correspondant suggested that there would be more fun at a Michael Barrymore pool party! Cannonball isn’t a dud, but it’s hardly something that I would be running centre-stage in a primetime schedule. I enjoyed the quickfire pace of the show and the challenges, along with good production values and the use of some great pop tunes as the contestants were put to the test in Malta. Clearly, Bognor or Clacton had nothing to offer, though they would have been rather grim in April and May when the show was taped.

The big mistake is wasting host Freddie Flintoff, who barely appeared on screen for five minutes, and was confined to a post-production commentary booth back in the UK, dubbing on the scripted links, as Richard Hammond did on Total Wipeout. Freddie is good fun, as viewers to his shows on Sky would confirm, and his wit and ability to react with people is a strong card of his, which the producers did not take advantage of. Instead,  we got a parade of largely unknown faces (barring ex-Saturdays singer Frankie Bridge) hosting the various elements, and to be fair they were not bad, but Freddie would have been better. I fear for Cannonball as Strictly returns tomorrow night to “Totally Wipe it Out”, to use a TV pun!

The X Factor (ITV) was great last weekend in a double return, and loads of fun from the judges in a complete contrast to the bear-pit atmosphere from a few years ago. There were two good changes with the singers able to sing their own songs, and a policy decision to cut down on the number of “rubbish” acts, with a pledge that the likes of Honey G will not darken our doors come the live shows. If you’ve given up on The X Factor in recent years, then do try it again, as I think you will be pleasantly surprised.

James Martin launched his new Saturday morning cooking show on ITV last weekend, which of course is not meant to be a rival to his old home of Saturday Kitchen on BBC 1. To be fair, it was recorded on location, and perfectly pleasant, but Saturday Kitchen rules  with the live element and the excellent Matt Tebbutt, who has made the show his own. James Martin also needs to remember what happened to Antony Worrall Thompson when he went to ITV with his Saturday Cooks show, which disappeared after being bounced around in the schedule, due to Martin taking over Saturday Kitchen.

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